Why I Don’t Want to Cut My Son’s Hair

I didn’t mean for it to get this way. I did cut his hairtwice, myself. Just a little snip in the back to get rid of the rat tail that was forming. But the second time, it came out a little crooked. So I lost my confidence.

Then I kept meaning to take him

to get it cut, but I never did really out of pure laziness. Eventually,it got to a point where it actually became a style. He looked like he should be in a boy band, with his hair all shaggy and side swept. Summer came, and it got even longer. People started referring to him as a "surfer dude."
He looked like he belonged on aCalifornia beach with a board under his arm (a toddler sized one, at least). His hair also seemed to fit with his attitude he’s an adrenaline junkie, a no fear kid who probably will grow up to surf and skateboard and excel atall manner of extreme sports. He has a laid back, happy go lucky smile on his face most of the time. So his hairstyle just matched his personality.

But the summer is long over. It started to dawn on me that maybe he needed a different style for school, for holiday pictures. One that reflects the changing of the seasons, the end of the lazy days of summer and the beginning of winter. But I still can’t bring myself to get it cut.

Most people remark on his hair. Often it’s admiration "Look at his beautiful hair! Don’t cut it!" although it’s usuallywomen who say that. Others (usually men) will joke about it, saying things like, "What is he, a hippie?" I’m not really sure what’s wrong with being a hippie, but that sounds like an insult. Others still (my husband included) think our son’s hair is somehow a hindrance, that it gets in his eyes or hangs over his ears. OK, I have seen him brush it out of his face with his hands. But I try to keep his bangs https://www.acheterviagrafr24.com/acheter-viagra-pfizer-avis/ pushed to the side, and generally his long hair doesn’t seem to bother him. I have had an urge to put it up in a man bun, though, which he’s adamantly refused.

But why don’t I want to cut it? What am I afraid will happen? First of all, I hate change. I know that when it happens, I will cry. I’ll make them sweep up all the hair from the floor and I’ll save it in a little plastic baggie. (I’m serious. I still have his umbilical cord stump. Don’t judge.)

It’s not that I think he needs to look like a boy, although he has been mistaken for a girl a couple of times. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with a boy with long hair. Why do we have to adhere to gender stereotypes anyway?

At the same time, I think it’s inevitable. He has little baby hair, with little wings that come out from the sides. It’s adorable, but it makes him look younger than he is, and he’s already small to begin with. Maybe I don’t need to go all or nothing with it maybe he could just get a little trim. But I worry that the hairdresser won’t follow directionsand will cut it all off anyway. And then I’ll look at him, with his short, responsible looking, big boy haircut, and I’ll wonder where my little baby has gone.

Because ultimately, I just don’t want that kid to grow up. Tina Donvito’s parenting writing has also been featured
wholesale wigs in The Washington Post, Scary Mommy, Mamalode and Fit Pregnancy.

Attention Seeking Children Are Better Learners Later

On

Toddlers who constantly demand ""look at me!" are most likely to become better collaborators and learners when they’re older, a study published in the journal Child Development found. As a result, they’re eager to collaborate with their parents’ attempts to socialize them."

Attention Seeking Children Are Better Learners Later On

Toddlers who constantly demand ""look at me!" are
wholesale virgin hair most likely to become better collaborators and learners when they’re older, a study published in the journal Child
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It’s Not Their Fault They’re Selfish

Researchers studied the behavior and brain scan images of kids while they played with others, were given rewards and prompted to share with their playmates. The findings revealed that, "even though

young children understood how sharing benefited the other child, they were unable to resist the temptation to make the ’selfish’ decision to keep much of the reward for themselves."

But thankfully, as a child’s brain matures, so will the child. "Brain scans revealed a region that matures along with children’s greater ability to make less selfish decisions," the study found.

Their Memories Are Better Than You Think

In a recent Slate article, Nicholas Day illustrated a timeline of what scientists have learned about toddlers’ memories over the last few decades. Before the 80s, it was believed that babies and young toddlers lived in the present with no memory of the past. Twenty years ago, however, a study found that 3 year olds could recount memories of Disney World 18 months after they visited. And recently, research noted a "27 month old child who’d seen a ‘magic shrinking machine’ remembered the experience some six years later."

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